Posts Tagged ‘buav’

Avon, Estee Lauder and Mary Kay found to be testing on animals

Despite consistent claims that Avon, Estee Lauder, and Mary Kay have halted the use of animal testing in their product development, the three companies have been found to be doing first-hand testing on animals in China.

Chinese laws dictate that all cosmetics sold must pass a series of animal tests before they are to be marketed. The tests all have alternative non-animal methods available, and Mary Kay has been working with the Chinese government to take steps towards the acceptance of these tests. The company still accepted using animal testing.

Avon and Estee Lauder meanwhile didn’t even complain, and got straight to the business of torturing animals as if they’d never claimed otherwise.

We have highlighted before the extent to which companies will to try to cover up their use of animal testing, or their use of animal tested ingredients (a big thanks to Uncaged). However, this is a whole new level of deceit.

Despite having consistently benefitted off of animal tested ingredients, Estee Lauder and Avon have always been adamant that they have halted the use of animal testing for their own benefit.

However, with this latest discovery regarding their use of animal testing in China, Avon, Estee Lauder, and Mary Kay are guilty of straight-up lying to their customers. Anyone will tell you that deceiving customers is one of the most damaging things a business can do.

And why would these companies do this? Profits, plain and simple. China is a huge market which is irresistable, and the idea of extra profits has these companies walking straight over their integrity in order to get to a piece of the pie.

Avon has also routinely been utilising toxicity tests on animals and covering them up. They have explained that utilising toxicity tests has allowed them to bring new and innovative products onto the market. New products = more profit, and animals better not get in the way.

The deceit that goes on surrounding animal testing is disgusting. Customers very rarely approve of animal testing cosmetics. The result is that companies have to find elaborately worded sentences to cover up their usage. They hide their true intents behind semantics.

Anyone who’s ever emailed a company guilty for animal testing will know this. It’s not uncommon to receive an email that is several paragraphs long, which basically states ‘we don’t like animal testing, but we gotta do it!’

As Dr Dan Lyons of Uncaged quite rightly states:

‘Sadly, these large animal testing companies appear to have a policy of systematically misleading consumers rather than responding to their overwhelming opposition to gratuitous cruelty to animals. Given that a large majority of people are opposed to these tests, we believe that we are witnessing a multimillion pound fraud as consumers purchase products on the basis of deceptive claims about their provenance.

My advice is to stay safe. Don’t trust any company that says it doesn’t test on animals in a vaguely worded statement, or a company that’s response to the question ‘do you test on animals?’ is longer than the word ‘no.’

Look out for the BUAV bunny logo, or the vegan society logo to ensure a trustworthy company.

A sign you can trust

The plus-side to this is that hopefully this discovery will result in other companies coming clean about their exploits with animal abuse, such as L’Oreal, Chanel, and Clinique – all of whom thinly disguise animal testing.

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Behind closed doors in Iowa

As some of you may be aware, Iowa state plan to vote on two bills that if passed will make undercover video of animal abuse on farms illegal and punishable by a $7000 fine and up to 5 years in prison. This is insane. This is not only a breach of animal welfare rights but also human rights; these bills are effectively silencing freedom of speech.  Fundamentally, these bills are more focused on protecting the farming and agriculture industry because they hold a huge economic impact. But what about our rights? 

Surely this whole façade clearly demonstrates that there is a problem with the farming industry abusing animals. Animal rights activists document animal ABUSE. If there was no abuse then no doubt there would be fewer damning videos. Some of these farmers that have had video evidence of their animal abuse released have said these undercover videos are ‘underhanded’. It’s almost as if they are suggesting that it is the video recording that is immoral. Not the abuse.

“They’re trying to intimidate whistleblowers and put a chill on legitimate anti-cruelty investigations. Clearly the industry feels it has something to hide or it wouldn’t be going to these extreme and absurd lengths.” (Bradley Miller, national director of Humane Farming Association)

“They are trying to criminalise someone for being an eyewitness to a crime” (PETA)

Instead of tackling the issue first hand and putting a stop to this inhumane abuse of animals the industry seem to want to take the easy way out and ban people discovering what goes on behind closed doors. I see it only fitting to quote Gretchen Wyler here:

“We must not refuse with our eyes what they endure with their bodies”

And so the Iowa government must not be allowed to ban our eyes from seeing what’s behind the door.

 

*UPDATE* Apparently Florida are also proposing a similar bill with much harsher penalties: £10,000 fine and up to 30 years prison time! Pure insanity. Especially when these people are witnesses to crimes! Sadly it seems this is a growing trend. Hopefully it can be nipped in the bud before it gets out of hand. What’s next?

Introduction to vegan beauty

Welcome to the vegan beauty section, you beautiful people! What’s this vegan beauty thing about, I hear you ask. Well, this category will encompass all things glamourous, and that are intended to make you that bit more beautiful. So primarily, it will be looking at cosmetics from make-up brushes to perfumes to more general stuff, such as toothpaste, as well as cruelty-free and vegan companies. There is also a sub-category for vegan-friendly fashion, where we will post our latest fashion finds, vegan designers, or simply the latest cool vegan info from the fashion world.

If you are confused at this point and don’t get what veganism has to do with cosmetics and fashion, let me explain briefly.

Firstly, fashion. Animal issues and fashion have been interlinked for many decades now (and, unfortunately, not usually in a positive way). The most obvious example of this somewhat negative relationship is the use of fur by the fashion industry. Fortunately, the cruel and unnecessary use of fur has been brought to the public’s attention and the majority of people (not necessarily just vegetarians and vegans) oppose its use for fashion. We now rarely see real fur exhibited by the fashion industry, despite attempts from fashion superpowers such as Chanel and DKNY. This is obviously a very positive thing, but ethical vegetarians and vegans see further difficulties. Key examples of materials that are used extensively in fashion but are derived from suffering or slaughtered animals are leather, silk and wool. Fortunately, there are two growing trends. Firstly, there is a growing trend for ethically sourced materials. Whilst leather cannot ever be ethically sourced (all leather will be from a slaughtered animal), silk and wool fortunately can. If you are confused as to why silk and wool are unethical in the first place, then please look out for future posts where we will talk about the difficulties behind both materials, and the positive trends developing in their production. The second trend in the fashion industry is the growing number of vegan designers. There is now a large range of shoes, bags, and other clothing which are free from leather and are 100% vegan. Look out for future posts detailing these companies and products.

Now, onto cosmetics. I’m sure we can all agree that testing cosmetics on animals is wrong. A common misconception (at least one that I have heard a few times) is that testing cosmetics on animals is a thing of the past, and no companies continue to do it. Sadly, the situation is quite the opposite. In the US, the majority of companies do test their products on animals. In the UK, whilst the testing of the final product was actually outlawed, many companies test every ingredient individually on animals to see the effects. On top of this, many companies make brash claims about not testing on animals, but are actually owned by companies which do (for example, The Body Shop is owned by L’Oreal, who are notorious for their animal testing policies). On top of this, the EU recently put into effect the REACH initiative, which proposes that all ingredients (including those which have been in use for thousands of years) should be independently tested to examine their effects on human health. This means a massive hike in animal testing across Europe. It’s not all bad news though – there are companies which are going out of their way to do their bit in protection of animals. There are also many cruelty-free initiatives by charities such as Uncaged and BUAV. We shall be discussing some of these companies and charities, their availability and their products in the future on this site. We shall also be discussing key issues in animal testing, companies that should be avoided, and some of the difficulties involved in avoiding cosmetics, as this is arguably one of these most confusing and least concrete areas of following veganism.

Stay gawjuz!

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