Posts Tagged ‘cosmetics’

Urban Decay- cruelty free beauty (part 1)

Urban Decay

In my opinion, Urban decay are a bit of a rare breed of make-up company. They are not only one of the hippest make-up companies out there, constantly bringing about beauty with an edge and never failing in their attempts to put the fun back into your make-up bag, but they do this all with a strict cruelty free ethos. Thereby showing you it is possible to have it all without resorting to testing on animals. Furthermore, although not a vegan company they still find the time to appreciate and recognise their vegan clientèle by creating specific vegan make-up palettes and adding ‘Marley’s purple paw’ to their vegan products whereby making it easier for their vegan customers to shop their range. On their website (the US version), they have a specific vegan section which contains a printable list of all the vegan products in their range (which you can easily pop in  your handbag so you can always be sure you’re buying vegan) and a set of ‘Vegan looks’ you can create using these products. Check it out here.

It is also worth noting here that many people conscious of what they are spending their hard earned money on do not realise that companies routinely use animal hairs in their brushes. Good news though: Urban Decay are here to save the day, yet again, by creating a range of synthetic make-up brushes.

While you’re here why not check out our list of other cool, cruelty free companies here!

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Superdrug and thoughts on animal testing

One year after Superdrug became animal testing free (in February 2010) I just felt the need to post in a few lines in order to declare my love for it. It seems not many people stroll off to the store when needing to stock up on their beauty must haves, but instead they head off for the slightly more pricey range of big name brands like Benefit, Max Factor and L’Oreal. But why? I don’t really know to be honest, because I don’t think there is much in it when it comes to the quality of the product itself, I only notice the huge difference on the price tag attached, and, of course, the cruelty inflicted upon animals.

I spot things in Superdrug that I didn’t actually know existed (maybe that’s down to me being naive, but I like to think otherwise…), whether it be a new type of shampoo, conditioner, mouthwash, face mask, soap, body lotion, hand cream, beauty gift, nail treatment – the list goes on, but the intention isn’t to bore you. They even claim to not test products that typically are, such as sun screens, hair dyes and shaving products. To top it all, items are suitable for vegetarians and nearly always vegans. And then I realise I have enough money left over from my other beauty bargains to purchase any newly spotted ones too! Yay!

I really can’t think of a better way to spend your money than on these well-priced, well-made, cruelty free products. Many people have the assumption that giving up brands that test on animals (seeing as the majority of them do) means sacrificing their looks in some way, but this definitely isn’t true and it’s time more people made the switch. Just because companies are too scared to give up animal testing and so try to mask it up, what happens behind those closed doors isn’t magic and doesn’t somehow transform the products into perfection – testing beauty products on animals isn’t a necessity as some brands like to make out. I’m also surprised by the number of people who don’t even consider it, because so many times has somebody had a quick ponder over the wider implications their purchase may have regarding animal welfare, then just said ‘Oh yeah, I didn’t really think of that’, before looking at what’s next on their shopping list. Fortunately, though, this isn’t true of everyone, and an increasing number of people are taking it into account. Anyway, I’m going on a bit of a rant now so should probably draw to a close here, but all I can say is that if you haven’t had a shop at Superdrug but are looking for more cruelty free places to go, then I definitely recommend it!

Introduction to vegan beauty

Welcome to the vegan beauty section, you beautiful people! What’s this vegan beauty thing about, I hear you ask. Well, this category will encompass all things glamourous, and that are intended to make you that bit more beautiful. So primarily, it will be looking at cosmetics from make-up brushes to perfumes to more general stuff, such as toothpaste, as well as cruelty-free and vegan companies. There is also a sub-category for vegan-friendly fashion, where we will post our latest fashion finds, vegan designers, or simply the latest cool vegan info from the fashion world.

If you are confused at this point and don’t get what veganism has to do with cosmetics and fashion, let me explain briefly.

Firstly, fashion. Animal issues and fashion have been interlinked for many decades now (and, unfortunately, not usually in a positive way). The most obvious example of this somewhat negative relationship is the use of fur by the fashion industry. Fortunately, the cruel and unnecessary use of fur has been brought to the public’s attention and the majority of people (not necessarily just vegetarians and vegans) oppose its use for fashion. We now rarely see real fur exhibited by the fashion industry, despite attempts from fashion superpowers such as Chanel and DKNY. This is obviously a very positive thing, but ethical vegetarians and vegans see further difficulties. Key examples of materials that are used extensively in fashion but are derived from suffering or slaughtered animals are leather, silk and wool. Fortunately, there are two growing trends. Firstly, there is a growing trend for ethically sourced materials. Whilst leather cannot ever be ethically sourced (all leather will be from a slaughtered animal), silk and wool fortunately can. If you are confused as to why silk and wool are unethical in the first place, then please look out for future posts where we will talk about the difficulties behind both materials, and the positive trends developing in their production. The second trend in the fashion industry is the growing number of vegan designers. There is now a large range of shoes, bags, and other clothing which are free from leather and are 100% vegan. Look out for future posts detailing these companies and products.

Now, onto cosmetics. I’m sure we can all agree that testing cosmetics on animals is wrong. A common misconception (at least one that I have heard a few times) is that testing cosmetics on animals is a thing of the past, and no companies continue to do it. Sadly, the situation is quite the opposite. In the US, the majority of companies do test their products on animals. In the UK, whilst the testing of the final product was actually outlawed, many companies test every ingredient individually on animals to see the effects. On top of this, many companies make brash claims about not testing on animals, but are actually owned by companies which do (for example, The Body Shop is owned by L’Oreal, who are notorious for their animal testing policies). On top of this, the EU recently put into effect the REACH initiative, which proposes that all ingredients (including those which have been in use for thousands of years) should be independently tested to examine their effects on human health. This means a massive hike in animal testing across Europe. It’s not all bad news though – there are companies which are going out of their way to do their bit in protection of animals. There are also many cruelty-free initiatives by charities such as Uncaged and BUAV. We shall be discussing some of these companies and charities, their availability and their products in the future on this site. We shall also be discussing key issues in animal testing, companies that should be avoided, and some of the difficulties involved in avoiding cosmetics, as this is arguably one of these most confusing and least concrete areas of following veganism.

Stay gawjuz!

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